Connect with us
Close Sidebar Panel Open Sidebar Panel

News

Motorcycle Awareness Takes Center Stage During May

As motorcyclists turn their calendars to a new month, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reminds all road users that May marks Motorcycle Awareness Month.

Advertisement

As motorcyclists turn their calendars to a new month, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reminds all road users that May marks Motorcycle Awareness Month.

Click Here to Read More
Advertisement

"Motorcyclists take to the highways in large numbers every spring, and it’s the responsibility of all road users to welcome us safely and attentively," said AMA president and CEO Rob Dingman. "This is why many states and local governments officially promote motorcycle awareness during the month of May. Unfortunately, many road users are not always mindful of those with whom they share the road, and an annual reminder is necessary for them to acknowledge the flow of motorcycles in traffic."

Efforts by the motorcycling community to establish Motorcycle Awareness Month can be traced back to the early 1980s, shortly after the release of the landmark "Hurt Report" conducted by Motorcycle Hall of Fame Professor Hugh H. "Harry" Hurt in 1981. The report is entitled "Volume I: Technical Report, Motorcycle Accident Cause Factors and Identification of Countermeasures, January, 1981 – Final Report." The Hurt Report set the benchmark for motorcycle safety research in the United States, if not the world.

Advertisement

One of the leading causes of crashes, according to the Hurt Report, was this: "The automobile driver fails to detect the inconspicuous motorcycle in traffic. This is due to lack of motorcycle and rider conspicuity and lack of caution and awareness of the automobile driver."

Although statistics reported by the Governors Highway Safety Association indicate that in recent years motorcycle fatalities are down by 2 percent in 2010 and 16 percent in 2009, any death of a motorcyclist in a crash is one too many. The AMA has long encouraged local and state governments to maintain or increase funding for motorcycle rider education and motorist awareness programs — two highly effective strategies to reduce the likelihood of motorcycle crashes.

Advertisement

"In the decades since the Hurt Report, the traffic environment has changed enormously, which prompted the AMA to begin campaigning for a new study several years ago," Dingman said. "We need real, hard answers to identify the reasons behind both the long-term increase in motorcyclists’ deaths and the short-term decline. This issue is too important to simply speculate."

The Federal Highway Administration has undertaken a comprehensive study at the Oklahoma Transportation Center, an independent and well-respected transportation research facility at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, Okla., under the direction of Dr. Samir Ahmed. The study is expected to conclude in 2013.

Advertisement

For more information about the AMA, visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

Advertisement
Click to comment
Connect
Motorcycle & Powersports News